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How digital is helping Defence Medical Services re-imagine HM Armed Forces healthcare

Defence Medical Services (DMS) is pursuing ground-breaking digital, data and technology transformation which will revolutionise Tri-Service healthcare provision to over 135,000 Armed Forces personnel.

Providing high quality healthcare support to HM Armed Forces, whenever and wherever it is required, presents a continuous challenge given the global mobility of military personnel.  HM Armed Forces’ needs are both diverse and numerous, ranging from serving infantry needing to consult urgently and virtually with their General Practitioners in the UK, to clinicians overseas performing surgery and medical procedures in often extremely challenging and austere environments, where access to fundamentals such as the internet cannot be taken for granted. 

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Telegraph

Exclusive: Army testing augmented reality glasses so medics can carry out remote ops in war zones

The British Army is developing a series of communication devices to ensure troops have the best medical capabilities wherever they are based.

It sounds like the stuff of science fiction – a specialist carries out surgery from anywhere in the world, relaying instructions straight onto futuristic glasses.

But the technology is already being trialled by the British Army, which is developing a series of hi-tech communication devices to ensure troops have the best medical capabilities wherever they are in the world.

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Soldier Magazine

Surgical Strikes - New tech is a force multiplier on the medical front line

In the dim and distant days of 1964, writer Arthur C Clarke made a bold prediction about how advances in communications would shape future medicine.

The author of 2001: A Space Odyssey asserted that in the coming century surgeons in one country would be operating on patients across the other side of the world.

It was an unprecedented claim made when a house could be bought for £3,500, The Beatles topped the charts, the space race was ramping up and the UK was still three years away from having colour television

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